China

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China

Post  T.J. Donatello on Thu Aug 09, 2012 4:16 am

I think since Communist China is such a great threat, it is worth discussing to some degree here.  

Communist China is a traditional backer of OPEC oil, and they are in a military alliance with Pakistan, to oppose India.

Here is a good segment from Sun News:

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/video/featured/prime-time/867432237001/the-chi-coms-are-coming/1777317168001

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Re: China

Post  polka23dot on Thu Aug 09, 2012 11:23 am

China and Russia have a very long tradition of invading and abusing their neighbors. China, Russia, and other dictatorships should be treated as our enemies and not allowed to purchase Western property and Western technology.

Most Chinese people believe that China should conquer Vietnam. They also believe that the entire Russian Far East should be part of China. International law gives all nations control over fishing and oil drilling 380 kilometers off their coasts. China refuses to obey this rule (which it had once agreed to). China recently declared that most of the 3.5 million square kilometers South China Sea is now Chinese property. The Philippines is drilling for oil off Palawan and Chinese claim that the drilling operations are illegal. China has threatened to use force against oil companies that drill in South China Sea without Chinese permission.

Russia is expected to annex a massive swath of the Arctic that is currently under international control. The area, which covers nearly one million square kilometers, would see an estimated 25 per cent of the world’s untapped hydrocarbon reserves as part of Russian territory.
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A recent American scientific research project revealed what many China experts have long known; China is a big place with lots of different cultures. The big divide is between the “wheat eaters” north of the Yangtze River and the “rice eaters” to the south. The fundamental (and now documented) conclusion is nothing new; the northerners and southerners. The southerners are collectivist and reflective while the northerners are more individualistic and analytical. In short the southerners fit the Western stereotype for all East Asians while the northerners are more “Western” in their attitudes. All of this is due to geography, external influences and diet. It began with the original Han (ethnic Chinese) whose civilization first appeared north of the Yangtze River. Up there the main grain crops were wheat, barley and the like. Rice is a much more productive crop (in terms of calories produced per unit of land) but is more labor intensive and require a higher degree of organization and discipline. It also requires more water which is why the drier north (north of the Yangtze River) remained reliant on non-rice grains. It took centuries to perfect rice cultivation, which is a more complex process than for other grains. It is also more dangerous because the farmers are exposed to a lot of water-borne diseases. It took centuries of trial and error but when it was all done (nearly 10,000 years ago) Chinese agriculture had become the most productive in the world. This led to China having, ever since, the largest population and the longest continuous empire. There were other factors at work. The northerners are less numerous than those rice eaters down south and also had to deal with centuries of “Northern Barbarians”. The worst of these were the Huns (who later ravaged the Roman Empire), the Mongols and the Manchus. The last two managed to conquer most of China but were eventually absorbed by the more numerous, better educated and persistent Han. In the south life was easier and the more militaristic and analytical northerners were resented, but feared and often obeyed. The emperor was usually from the north and lived up there. But as southerners loved to the say; “the mountains are high and the emperor is far away...” The lesson for the West is that while the Chinese may appear monolithic they are anything but. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htmurph/articles/20140610.aspx

Russian depopulation and resulting deindustrialization of the Far East and Siberia continue to haunt Moscow. The precipitous decline in the region's population over the past decade can be traced to the lifting of Soviet-era controls on residency and place of employment in the early 1990's. This caused an "out-migration" of over two million Russians leaving many areas entirely unpopulated. As a result, once vibrant towns created during the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway have been deserted and forgotten. Chinese migrants entering the region to replace the departing Russians have encountered harsh resistance from the remaining population. Sergei Darkin, a government official from the city of Vladivostok, says, "We have to ensure that there is no large-scale assimilation. The Chinese who come here have to go back again." source: http://www.globalpolitician.com/print.asp?id=799
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Good source of news about China: http://chinadigitaltimes.net/

Good, long article about China: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20120829.aspx

China is a strange country: http://www.businessinsider.com/crazy-things-happening-in-china-2013-12?op=1

Anti-Japan protests in China: http://atmo4.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/09/anti-japan-protests-in-china/100370/#img19

South Korea is pressuring China to do something about all the Chinese fishing boats that poach in South Korean waters. The Chinese national government admits, quietly to South Korean diplomats, that corrupt local officials refuse to crack down on the poaching fishing fleets because the fleet owners pay lucrative bribes to avoid punishment. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20121107.aspx

The [Chinese] government continues to encourage anti-Japanese activities and attitudes. Sales of Japanese products, including those built in China, will be down this year. The Beijing Marathon (run on the November 25th, 2012) has barred Japanese entrants. In 31 years of operation, this is the first time such a ban was used. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20121120.aspx

Future war between China and the Philippines: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/phillip/articles/20121205.aspx

About two-thirds of the wealthy entrepreneurs (people who have fortunes of over $15.9 million) are emigrating or planning to do so. Many renounce their Chinese citizenship after having obtained citizenship in a foreign nation. Others move their family and many assets overseas and obtain the option to switch citizenship (China does not allow dual-citizenship). What these people are fleeing is fear, fear that the corrupt Chinese police state will collapse and so will the economy and order. They are saying; “it’s been nice but it won’t last and I’m getting out while I can.”  source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20121207.aspx

Devastating effects of pollution in China: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4DtOhe2LfQ

Researchers from the U.S., Israel and China analyzed Chinese health and life-expectancy data and concluded that the air pollution problems in northern China (mainly from burning coal to generate electricity) have reduced life expectancy up there by at least five years. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20130712.aspx

The new Chinese leadership openly called for the military to get ready for regional (with the neighbors) war. Newly elected leaders in Japan and South Korea made similar pronouncements, in response to growing Chinese aggression. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20121225.aspx

Chinese are now derisively referring to their leaders as the Deng Dynasty: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htlead/articles/20121229.aspx

Last year China surpassed the U.S. as the largest trading nation on the planet. In 2012 Chinese imports and exports totaled $3.87 trillion compared to $3.82 trillion for the U.S. However, if you count services, the U.S. still leads, with total (for goods and services) of $4.93 trillion. For 70 years the U.S. has been the largest trading nation in the world. The U.S. GDP last year was $15 trillion compared to $7.3 trillion for China. Annual GDP growth is slowing in China, from ten percent to 7-8 percent. U.S. growth is much lower, more like two percent. China expects to surpass the United States in GDP in the next two decades... In Tibet the government is increasing its effort to seize illegal satellite dishes. These devices enable Tibetans to receive uncensored news from outside China, which helps keep resistance against Chinese rule in Tibet going.   source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20130211.aspx

The Chinese workers are very efficient and tend to get their projects done on time and on budget. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/algeria/articles/20130417.aspx

Currently, China is more of a superpower than Russia. Chinese GDP is more than three times Russia’s and China is spending more than three times as much on defense as Russia (which is trying to maintain defense spending at 2.8 percent of GDP). Current Russian GDP is nearly $2 trillion and 2.8 percent of that is $50 billion. The U.S. spends over three percent of a $15 trillion GDP on defense but is reducing that a bit.  Economy is destiny, as the Russians have learned. With recent spectacular economic growth in China, the Russians see the possibility of a return to the status of a major military power. At the moment China has twice as many troops and most of them have better weapons. But the cost fixing this appears to be more than the Russians can afford. China is offering to help by spending billions more on Russian weapons (despite the flagrant Chinese theft of Russian military tech). As distasteful as the situation is, the Russians really do need some help. The Russians are also becoming aware that they were not much of a superpower back in the Soviet days. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/russia/articles/20130328.aspx

Chinese theft of Western technology includes cracking the security on high-end CAD (computer aided design) software and selling the stuff to Western users.  source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htintel/articles/20130410.aspx

More and more Filipino fishermen are complaining to the government that they are being chased away from their traditional fishing areas off the Filipino coast by Chinese coast guard ships. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/phillip/articles/20130424.aspx

Because China is in clear violation of international treaties it has signed, it is refusing to accept international courts or arbitration to settle the territorial disputes off its coasts. China also refuses to allow a third party to decide the border disputes with India... Despite the growing government support for anti-corruption efforts, police have been ordered to track down and arrest civilians who carry out freelance investigations of corrupt officials and then share their findings on the Internet. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20130428.aspx

[Burma (Myanmar)] China is reported to have delivered up to five M-17 helicopters, some armed with Chinese heat-seeking missiles, to the UWSA (United Wa State Army) in the north. This would enable the UWSA to effectively attack government Mi-24 helicopter gunships, as well as more quickly move armed men and supplies around the sparely populated and generally roadless border region... The Burmese are upset at continued shipments of Chinese weapons to the UWSA, including some armored vehicles. The helicopter deal is particularly scary... Opium and heroin production have been revived in the past few years. Production of methamphetamine is huge. Called "yaba" ("crazy drug") locally, most of it is smuggled out via Thailand. Over the last few years, production of yaba tablets has soared. The meth labs are easier to conceal than poppy fields (opium is the sap of poppy plants) and the meth labs are believed to produce several hundred million tablets a year. The tribal rebels, especially the UWSA use the profits to buy more weapons for their fighters, and run their rebel organizations. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/myanmar/articles/20130430.aspx

Many Chinese leaders believe that they cannot have military leadership that is corruption free, capable of fighting a modern enemy, and politically loyal and reliable at the same time. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htlead/articles/20130506.aspx

Chinese leaders are making much of the fact that 200 years ago China was a mighty empire that generated a third of world GDP and 150 years later that was down to less than five percent. Now, because economic reforms in the 1980s, Chinese GDP is 16 percent of the world total and rising. But 200 years ago China was 35 percent of the world’s population and now is 20 percent. The U.S. has a fifth of GDP on the planet with only five percent of the population... Traditional China was an arrogant, aggressive and brutal state. The neighbors all have considerable experience with this and don’t look forward to seeing the bad old days return. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htwin/articles/20130514.aspx

Leaders of the Communist Party of China are mostly professional engineers. source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technocracy

China has become more blatant in copying foreign designs, and then selling them to foreign customers and competing with the original. Suing the Chinese usually does not work, as Chinese courts favor the Chinese copycats, not the original creator of the technology. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htnavai/articles/20130530.aspx

Chinese wonder why their tourists behave so badly: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/05/30/us-china-tourism-idUSBRE94T05820130530

Chinese are displacing Arabs as the main facilitators of illegal activities (mining, logging, poaching, smuggling and so on) in Africa. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20130607.aspx

China ships weapons to the Sudanese government, and denies it. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htproc/articles/20130910.aspx

Corruption, and growing popular unrest because of it, continues to be the major internal threat to continued Communist Party control of China... Prosecuting all corrupt officials would be impossible and would shut down the government... So far the corruption continues, although practitioners are now more discreet and more enthusiastic about increased Internet censorship. It is those damn Internet leaks that are getting corrupt officials on the government hit list and literally getting some corrupt officials killed. This freelance Internet based journalism is illegal and the government is prosecuting those who are too successful at it. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20130917.aspx

Chinese government recently revealed the number of people involved in Internet censorship operations; two million. This operation is called Golden Shield (or “Great Firewall of China” in the West) and it’s a huge information control system that has been under construction for a decade. Before the new revelations Golden Shield was believed to have at least 40,000 full time Ministry of Public Security employees dedicated to monitoring and censoring Internet use throughout the country. This was done using specialized hardware and software and lots of paid and volunteer censors. These “irregulars” were known to be numerous but it was difficult to get an accurate estimate. Now the government revealed that irregulars bring the total Internet censorship manpower up to two million. This is for keeping some 500 million Chinese Internet users under control. Several billion dollars has been spent on Golden Shield so far. While the Great Firewall cannot stop someone expert at how the Internet works, it does greatly restrict the other 90 percent of Internet users... In 2011 China created a new organization to handle Internet censorship. Called the State Internet Information Office, it consolidated all Internet censorship activity. This was done, in part, to halt the fragmentation of Internet censorship activity. This was happening because over a dozen government agencies engage in censorship (of films, TV, radio, newspapers, books, advertising, text books, and so on). Most of these agencies have expanded their efforts to include similar material that shows up on the Internet. This was leading to turf wars, or Internet sites getting an OK from one censorship authority and a shutdown notice from another. This sort of activity is typical of government bureaucracies, no matter where they are... Meanwhile Internet security companies outside China are discovering, documenting and publicizing more and more Chinese hacker groups and the large campaigns these groups wage on the rest of the world. China denies everything. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20131006.aspx

One reason sparsely populated Tibet is so important to China is because it is where five of the largest rivers in India and East Asia begin. These rivers supply water to 40 percent of the world population. India, Vietnam and Burma fear that Chinese dam building on these rivers will eventually divert water and leave less for non-Chinese... Within China the government demands that everyone support Chinese foreign policy. A recent example of this was an order for the 250,000 Chinese journalists to avoid any positive stories about Japan... Journalists were also reminded that positive stories about democracy or Western concepts of citizen rights were also forbidden. Chinese journalists are given an examination each year, to ensure they know and understand all the current guidelines, before they get their official journalist status renewed... China is trying to bully its way into gaining control over all the islands and reefs in the South China Sea and all the oil and gas wealth on the sea bottom (as well as the fish in between). source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20131021.aspx

Chinese security forces are often crucial to many corrupt practices that involve outright theft of land. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20131119.aspx

China continues to demand payback for the damage Japan did to China during World War II and that is increasing the risk of fighting, or even war, between the two nations. Meanwhile the Filipino and Chinese government are embroiled in a very public spat over Filipino accusations that China is behaving like the Nazis did before World War II, when Germany claimed ownership of all of Austria plus parts of France, Poland and Czechoslovakia as part of “Greater Germany.” source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20140209.aspx

A third of China’s most successful businessmen (and some women) are moving their families and fortunes overseas. Many of these economic refugees are obtaining dual citizenship wherever they can. Many are sending their wives to give birth in the United States, so that some of their children will be United States citizens. These refugees already have moved over half a trillion dollars in assets out of China and at current rates that will double in the next three years. These wealthy refugees fear the pollution and corruption in China and are losing faith in the current government (a dictatorship run by the Chinese Communist Party) to set things right before the country collapses into another period of civil strife and economic collapse. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htlead/articles/20140316.aspx

Because of decades of economic sanctions Iran has come to depend on China to help smuggle forbidden items into Iran... American items are usually obtained by Chinese trading companies, who serve as a one-stop-shopping source for many countries. The trading companies break American laws when they ship some types of restricted (by American regulations) gear to embargoed nations. This is done using forged documents and bribes that mask these operations for years. These Chinese exporters have little fear of punishment at home because the Chinese government refuses to discipline its wayward firms. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htproc/articles/20140416.aspx

China responded to Vietnam, Japan and the Philippines going to court over South China Sea disputes by declaring it would ignore the court proceedings and not recognize any “anti-Chinese” court decisions. China claims “indisputable sovereignty” over all the South China Sea and does not recognize any other claims. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/phillip/articles/20140614.aspx


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Cyber War with China

Post  polka23dot on Tue Aug 14, 2012 7:40 pm

China has an army of hackers who have been successfully attacking the West and stealing its secrets for over a decade.

"The U.S. Department of Defense had long asked for permission to go on the offensive using Cyber War weapons. But the U.S. government regularly and publicly declined to retaliate against constant attack from China, mainly because there were fears that there could be legal repercussions and that weapons used might get out of control and cause a lot of damage to innocent parties. Now it's believed that the secret war has begun in earnest, including attacks against China." source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20120814.aspx

China denies, defies and keeps on attacking USA: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130208.aspx

The U.S. recently sent to American ISPs (Internet Service Providers) a list of Internet addresses that were the source of recent hacker attacks on American corporate and government networks that resulted in huge quantities of data being stolen. Lists like this make it easier for ISPs to protect their customers from known hacker organizations. The recently sent list deliberately left out the fact that nearly all these addresses were located in China. More precisely, most of these addresses were in the same neighborhood as the Chinese Cyber War organization. Anyone with minimal knowledge of the Internet could have found out exactly where those addresses were located. But the American government does not yet want to call out China on over a decade of Internet based espionage against the United States and its allies. Some of those allies have been less reticent. American leaders apparently fear that by going on the record that China is the source of a huge espionage campaign there will be enormous political pressure to do something about it. The fact of the matter is that there is little you can do about it other than try to improve Internet defenses (an endless and increasingly expensive task) and talk about retaliation. But how do you retaliate? It’s historically rare for major powers to go to war just over espionage. As China points out, this Internet espionage goes both ways. But the West has a lot more to steal, compared to China, and that works to China’s advantage. China believes that the U.S. will not risk conventional combat in an effort to shut down China’s Internet hacking campaign. So far that assessment has been correct. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htwin/articles/20130306.aspx

China has been hacking away at U.S. targets for over a decade now and shows no signs of slowing down, despite growing U.S. efforts to erect better defenses. In addition to recent attacks on American media companies, China has also launched well organized and very deliberate attacks on American defense companies and specific Department of Defense computer networks. Even when caught in the act, the hackers often got away with a lot of valuable material. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130413.aspx

British defense firm QinetiQ recently revealed that over the last three years Chinese hackers had quietly gotten into its networks and apparently stolen just about everything. This was particularly embarrassing as QinetiQ had, for over half a century, supplied specialized gear to British spies, as well as foreign intel agencies. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130506.aspx

The non-government victims of China’s long (over a decade) Internet based espionage campaign are desperate to come up with remedies. Building better defenses is a flawed approach because, well, there are so many undiscovered flaws in hardware and software used on the Internet. Some companies can achieve a very high level of protection, but this is very expensive and imposes limitations on how they can use the Internet. What many of these corporations, and (much more discreetly) some government officials are discussing as striking back at the attackers. While most counterattack methods are technically illegal, some ideas are gaining traction... Offensive Cyber War involves a lot more than just trying to hack your way into specific enemy computers and networks. First you have to find out what you are up against. This begins with mapping where everything on enemy networks is. China was noted doing this back in 2005, and the mapping they were doing was a prerequisite to a major attack on non-Chinese systems that is still underway. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130604.aspx

The U.S. Department of Defense recently received a report (from the Defense Science Board) detailing what was known about how much military and commercial technical data had been stolen by Chinese Internet (and more conventional) espionage efforts. The details of the report were kept secret, but the conclusion was that most major American weapons systems had been plundered, in addition to a lot of non-defense technology. It’s not just the United States that is being hit but most nations with anything worth stealing. Many of these nations are noticing that China is the source of most of this espionage and few are content to remain silent any longer. It’s no secret that Chinese intelligence collecting efforts in the last decade have been spectacularly successful. As the rest of the world comes to realize the extent of this success there is a building desire for retaliation... Technically, China has committed acts of war because of the degree to which it penetrated military networks and carried off highly secret material... All this espionage, in all its forms, has played a large part in turning China into one of the mightiest industrial and military powers on the planet. China is having a hard time hiding the source of the new technologies they are incorporating into their weapons and commercial products... The final ingredient is a shadowy venture capital operation, sometimes called Project 863, that offers money for Chinese entrepreneurs who will turn the stolen technology into something real... Chinese firms are boldly using their stolen technology, daring foreign firms to try and use Chinese courts to get justice. Instead, the foreign firms are trying to muster support from their governments for lawsuits outside China. Naturally, the Chinese government will howl and insist that it’s all a plot to oppress China. This has worked for a long time, but many of the victims are now telling China that this conflict is being taken to a new, and more dangerous, level. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130605.aspx

Over the last decade Internet security firms (especially Kaspersky Labs and Symantec) have been increasingly successful at identifying the hacker organizations responsible for some of the large-scale hacker attacks on business and government networks. The latest group to be identified is from China and has been called Hidden Lynx. This group appears to contain 50-100 hackers (as identified by their coding style) and is believed to be largely responsible for a large scale espionage campaign (“Operation Aurora) in 2010 and is still active. The security firms also identify and describe major malware (software created by hackers for penetrating and stealing from target systems. Earlier this year Kaspersky Labs discovered of a stealthy espionage program called NetTraveler. This bit of malware had been secretly planted in PCs used by diplomats and government officials in over 40 countries. Also hit were oil companies and political activists opposed to China. No samples of the NetTraveler from Israel were available for this analysis, but the program apparently did appear in Israel (but may have been prevented from stealing anything). Dissection of NetTraveler indicated it was created by about fifty different people, most of them Chinese speakers who knew how to program in English... For Chinese hackers that behave (don't do cybercrimes against Chinese targets) the rewards are great. Large bounties are paid for sensitive military and government data taken from the West. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130923.aspx

Earlier this year it was revealed by Western Internet security researchers that a specific Chinese military organization, “Unit 61398” has been responsible for over a thousand attacks on government organizations and commercial firms since 2006... Unit 61398 is believed to consist of several thousand full time military and civilian personnel as well as part-time civilians. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20131120.aspx

Tibetan exiles are fighting back against Chinese Cyber War attacks. This is mainly because China's hackers have become easier to identify as they have been getting cocky and careless. This has made many of their victims more determined to defend themselves from the Chinese attacks because now they know they are being hacked and by who. China has long accused India of supporting the separatists in Tibet. India has hosted Tibetan refugees since the first ones came across in the early 1950s, after China invaded and reconquered Tibet (which had been independent since 1914.) Among the more alert victims are the Tibetan exiles running the CTA (Central Tibetan Administration, formerly the Tibetan government in exile) in India where they are working to regain Tibetan independence. The CTA is headquartered in an Indian hill town (Dharamsala) near the Tibetan border. This is the home of the Dali Lama and widely considered the most hacked (mainly by the Chinese) place on the planet. Since the Chinese hacking activity became more known and understood the CTA staff and supporters are now diligently learning how to neutralize or avoid the Chinese hacking. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20140111.aspx


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Re: China

Post  Hereticable on Fri Aug 24, 2012 11:30 am

TonoFonseca wrote:I think since Communist China is such a great threat, it is worth discussing to some degree here.

Communist China is a traditional backer of OPEC oil, and they are in a military alliance with Pakistan, to oppose India.

Here is a good segment from Sun News:

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/video/featured/prime-time/867432237001/the-chi-coms-are-coming/1777317168001

I think the government of the PRC should be engaged more because the Chinese are not one bloc. Most Chinese people have ZERO say in how their country is run or it's foreign policy...and most would be perfect allies in the struggle against the global Jihad.

China is already battling Muslim extremists in their Western regions. They are officially atheist and very nationalistic despite Communism bringing a mini-dark age on them in Mao's time. The main issue with China is their government - but every generation is more open and sees what is going on. The rich and smart are still leaving for greener pastures. Even those who won't leave send their children to be educated overseas. This is going to have a huge effect on China's future leadership. Whilst they may call themselves Communist they are fascist in reality. Most European countries are more socialist than China will ever be.

I see them as a potential ally and friend but right now as a wild card - they don't even have full control of their country yet so it remains to be see what the future holds. Certainly they don't trust the Russians one bit as see them even now as the greatest threat. They would rather trade with the West and get rich than fight us. If it can be pointed out we have more in common than with Islamic states we will see a policy shift I believe. They are not stupid and were fighting Muslim invaders back in the Tang Dynasty.

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Chinese spies

Post  polka23dot on Fri Mar 29, 2013 7:32 am

March 28, 2013: Two years after his arrest in the United States, Chinese born Sixing Liu was recently sentenced to six years in prison, for providing China with American military technology. Liu was an engineer for a firm that built navigation systems for defense equipment. Liu was raised in China but had lived in the U.S. for two decades. Liu is a legal U.S. resident and was arrested in 2011 because of a trip to China in 2010. There he had described to Chinese officials what his company was doing on Department of Defense projects. The evidence was found on one of Liu's personal computers. Liu made the trip without informing his employer.

American counter-intelligence efforts are catching and convicting a growing number of Chinese spies in the United States. This may be more because of increased spying efforts by China than because of better FBI and CIA methods. The culprits have been caught, for example, with electronic versions of classified army manuals, valuable trade secrets (with military applications), and documents containing technical details of the Space Shuttle, the Delta IV satellite launcher, the F-15 fighter, B-52 bomber, CH-46/47 helicopters, and several other military systems.

Incidents like this are just another example of China's use of industrial espionage to turn their country into the mightiest industrial and military power on the planet. For over two decades China has been attempting to do what the Soviet Union never accomplished, steal Western technology and then use it to move ahead of the West. The Soviets lacked the many essential supporting industries found in the West (most founded and run by entrepreneurs) and was never able to get all the many pieces needed to match Western technical accomplishments. Soviet copies of American computers, for example, were crude, less reliable, and less powerful, as were their jet fighters, tanks, and warships.

China gets around this by making it profitable for Western firms to set up factories in China, where Chinese managers and workers can be taught how to make things right. At the same time China allows thousands of their best students to go to the United States to study. While most of these students will stay in America, where there are better jobs and more opportunities, some will come back to China and bring American business and technical skills with them. Finally, China energetically uses the "thousand grains of sand" approach to espionage. This involves China trying to get all Chinese going overseas, and those of Chinese ancestry living outside the motherland, to spy for China, if only a tiny bit.

This approach to espionage is nothing new. Other nations have used similar systems for centuries. What is unusual is the scale of the Chinese effort. Backing it all up is a Chinese intelligence bureaucracy back home that is huge, with nearly 100,000 people working just to keep track of the many Chinese overseas and what they could, or should, be to trying to grab for the motherland. It begins whith Chinese intelligence officials examining who is going overseas and for what purpose. Chinese citizens cannot leave the country, legally, without the state security organizations being notified. The intel people are not being asked to give permission. They are being alerted in case they want to have a talk with students, tourists, or business people before they leave the country. Interviews are often held when these people come back as well.

Those who might be coming in contact with useful information are asked to remember what they saw or bring back souvenirs. Over 100,000 Chinese students go off to foreign universities each year. Even more go abroad as tourists or on business. Most of these people were not asked to actually act as spies but simply to share with Chinese government officials (who are not always identified as intelligence personnel) whatever information was obtained. The more ambitious of these people are getting caught and prosecuted. But the majority (who are quite casual and, individually, bring back relatively little) are almost impossible to catch.

Like the Russians, the Chinese are also employing the traditional methods, using people with diplomatic immunity to recruit spies and offering cash, or whatever, to get people to sell them information. This is still effective, and when combined with the "thousand grains of sand" methods, brings in a lot of secrets. The final ingredient is a shadowy venture capital operation, sometimes called Project 863, that offers money for Chinese entrepreneurs who will turn the stolen technology into something real. No questions asked. If you can get back to China with the secrets, you are home free and potentially very rich.

But there are some legal problems. When the Chinese steal some technology and produce something that the Western victims can prove was stolen (via patents and prior use of the technology), legal action can make it impossible, or very difficult, to sell anything using the stolen tech outside of China. For that reason the Chinese like to steal military technology. This kind of stuff (at least the most advanced models) rarely leaves China. And in some cases, like manufacturing technology, there's an advantage to not selling it outside of China. Because China is still a communist dictatorship, the courts do as they are told and they are rarely told to honor foreign patent claims.

source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htintel/articles/20130328.aspx

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Hollywood Goes Down For China

Post  polka23dot on Fri Apr 19, 2013 6:11 pm

The American movie industry has quietly agreed to become part of the Chinese Information War effort. Increasingly over the past decade U.S. film companies have agreed to not only censor their films before they are shown in China, but to edit scripts for the original versions of films so as to conform to the Chinese view of how China should be portrayed. The most blatant example of this was the remake of the 1984 movie Red Dawn, which dealt with an invasion of the United States by Russia and Cuba via Mexico. As bizarre as that all was, the movie was entertaining and a commercial success. Five years ago it was decided to do a remake of Red Dawn, and this time the Chinese would be the invaders. Before the movie could be released in 2010, China found out about the film and told the American film community that unless changes were made in Red Dawn, there would be serious consequences for the American movie industry (as in far fewer American films being allowed to screen in China.) In response the producers edited the film, and reshot scenes as needed, in order to change the invaders from Chinese to North Koreans. This delayed release of the film by two years. The changes may have pleased the Chinese, but the American audience stayed away in droves and that was largely because the changes demanded by the Chinese were well known and much reviled.

While American movie makers have made edits to their films to get them shown in major markets (especially English speaking countries and major non-English speaking nations) they have never let foreign nations have, in effect, script approval of the original version meant mainly for American audiences. This power enables China to control its image as seen via American films. This is unprecedented and Hollywood does not want to talk about it. It is basically about money. Over the last twenty years foreign markets have come to generate the majority of sales for American films, especially during the initial release in theaters. China lets few American films in, and usually only the big hits that are already profitable. What Hollywood is hoping is that China will allow more American movies in and help turn marginal earners into profitable projects.

source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20130419.aspx

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Re: China

Post  polka23dot on Mon Aug 18, 2014 6:33 pm

The government anti-corruption campaign has prosecuted more high-ranking thieves recently, and a lot more lower-ranking officials as well. This campaign has been going on longer, and taking down more people than any previous effort. The government also insists that this campaign will not, as in the past, simply diminish and fade away as past anti-corruption efforts have. This worries a lot of Chinese, even though most admit that the corruption is the greatest threat the current communist government faces. The potential problem is the growing risk that corrupt businessmen and officials who fear prosecution will get organized and fight back. This could mean anything from assassinations of politicians backing the prosecutions to the worst case; another civil war. The fears are real because most Chinese with a lot of money (the top one percent of wealthy Chinese basically own a third of the wealth and control most of the economy) had to deal with corruption (either enthusiastically or out of necessity) to get where they are. If supreme leader Xi Jinping and his anti-corruption allies are to succeed they must continue their efforts (to greatly diminish the corruption and keep it diminished) without triggering a violent response. Where this gets tricky is figuring out how to deal with all those senior government officials who are dirty, especially since a lot of them would rather not be. Worse yet, Xi Jinping has broken a long-observed, but unwritten, rule against prosecuting the most senior officials. Xi Jinping is now doing that and this makes many Chinese, and non-Chinese nervous... A growing number of wealthy Chinese and senior government officials are moving assets, and sometimes family, to other countries. Just in case. This sort of moving cash out of the country is often illegal and it is estimated that over a trillion dollars have been moved since 2002. More wealthy Chinese are now being prosecuted for this money laundering. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20140817.aspx

While the United States is often accused of ignoring the cultural differences with its allies and opponents, and making bad decisions based on misperceptions, other countries often do the same. While the United States has made many mistakes because American leaders thought foreigners thought like Americans (but in a different language) at least the U.S. has come to acknowledge that this problem exists. Not so in China where this lack of empathy for other cultures is rampant in the government and especially in the military. source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20140907.aspx

In late August the Chinese government issued a public demand that all Chinese journalists learn “Marxist news values”. This means only reporting things that the communist government wants reported and reporting in a way that the government approves of. source: http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htiw/articles/20140917.aspx

For most of the month Chinese troops have been several kilometers inside Indian territory trying to force the Indians to halt construction of roads, military bases and other infrastructure in what the Chinese claim is their territory... There is growing anger in Burma against China. A major issue is all the illegal industries in the tribal north that export to China. This involves lumber, gems and other raw materials as well as illegal drugs. This trade is believed to be worth more than the $3.4 billion a year in legitimate exports and most of the cash flows through semi-legal Burmese banks on the Chinese border. China has strict controls on moving cash (no more than $50,000 a year per person) in or out. No such rules in Burma and it’s much easier to open bank accounts in Burma. Chinese banking officials estimate that legal and illegal cash flows from China to Burma are over $30 billion a year.  source: http://www.strategypage.com/qnd/china/articles/20140926.aspx

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong have been cleaning up after themselves after a night of battles with police who used tear gas and pepper spray in a crackdown condemned around the world. Thousands of people are occupying the Admiralty district of the city in continued opposition to the Chinese Government’s refusal to let them select their own candidates for leadership elections in 2017, allowing only Beijing-backed politicians to stand. As protests continue, people have been seen distributing food and water as well as cleaning up after themselves in the famously orderly city. At the main protest site at the city’s Government headquarters, students sorted plastic bottles for recycling even as they wore goggles and plastic sheets to protect against pepper spray. A polite note was also seen left on a vandalized police van, apologizing for the damage. source: www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/9761598.html

The Chinese government doesn't just censor its internet. It also pays people to leave fake comments that make the country and its communist regime look good. As detailed in "Blocked on Weibo" by Jason Q. Ng, one of the many phrases that gets censored in China is "50 cents." This term references a huge set of people hired by the government to post internet comments spinning the news in China's favor — people who are supposedly paid 50 cents of Renminbi for every post... British magazine the New Statesman actually tracked down one of these hired propagandists in 2012. The anonymous 26-year-old said he had "too many usernames" to count and that he received an email from the local internet publicity office every morning explaining what news he should focus on that day... China's censorship program, the Golden Shield Project, known to the West as the "Great Firewall," has existed for nearly a decade. It blocks foreign websites that threaten the Communist message, as well as surveys and filters content on home soil. Journalists and netizens alike who don't abide by the rules face prison — or worse... China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology took the party's abilities a step further in 2014, setting up a training center, according to Radio Free Asia. The program intends to teach aspiring members how to direct and control online discussions... China's censorship was alive and well during recent protests in Hong Kong. source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chinas-50-cent-party-2014-10

Yu Long, a Chinese national and a former resident of Connecticut, has been charged with trying to take confidential U.S. military documents to China... Yu, who worked as a senior engineer for a Connecticut defense contractor between 2008 and earlier this year, reportedly said that he had experience in working on the F119 and F135 engines, which are manufactured by Hartford, Connecticut-based United Technologies and used in U.S. military planes. source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chinese-man-working-on-us-fighter-jets-caught -with-documents-and-cash-at-airports-2014-12

China has just overtaken the United States as the world’s largest economy... With savings and investment making up close to 50 percent of G.D.P., the Chinese worry about having too much savings, just as Americans worry about having too little. In other areas, such as manufacturing, the Chinese overtook the U.S. only within the past several years. They still trail America when it comes to the number of patents awarded, but they are closing the gap... China outpaces America in the number of people executed every year, but the U.S. is far ahead when it comes to the proportion of the population in prison (more than 700 per 100,000 people). China overtook the U.S. in 2007 as the world’s largest polluter, by total volume, though on a per capita basis we continue to hold the lead... The typical American family is worse off than it was a quarter-century ago, adjusted for inflation; the proportion of people in poverty has increased. China, too, is marked by high levels of inequality, but its economy has been doing some good for most of its citizens. China moved some 500 million people out of poverty during the same period that saw America’s middle class enter a period of stagnation. An economic model that doesn’t serve a majority of its citizens is not going to provide a role model for others to emulate. America should see the rise of China as a wake-up call to put our own house in order. source: http://www.vanityfair.com/business/2015/01/china-worlds-largest-economy

China seems to have built the equivalent of $6.8 trillion in bridges to nowhere... The Chinese economy has wasted $6.8 trillion in investment during the last four years... That's two years of output for the entire German economy. source: http://www.businessinsider.com/china-economy-waste-malinvestment-slowdown-2014-11

The real home of Christmas is a strange and unknown Chinese city called Yiwu... It’s hard to know how to describe Yiwu Market’s scale. I could start with the statistics; how it currently covers an area of four million sq m, with 62,000 booths inside. I could tell you how it is estimated to have an incredible 40,000 visitors every day, 5,000 of whom are said to be buyers from foreign countries... China is the global leader in creating plastic junk, and Yiwu market is its showroom... The real secret of China’s manufacturing success is keeping labor costs so low that making things by hand is cheaper than using machines. source: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20141218-the-hidden-home-of-christmas

Apple iPhones are made by Chinese semi-slaves: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DppnrvYkONI

Yu Long, a Chinese national and a former resident of Connecticut, has been charged with trying to take confidential U.S. military documents to China... Yu, who worked as a senior engineer for a Connecticut defense contractor between 2008 and earlier this year, reportedly said that he had experience in working on the F119 and F135 engines, which are manufactured by Hartford, Connecticut-based United Technologies and used in U.S. military planes. source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chinese-man-working-on-us-fighter-jets-caught -with-documents-and-cash-at-airports-2014-12

Chinese buildings are not maintained because Chinese people do not care about neighbors living in the same building: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9eXi3RL8q4

If you don't look like a Chinese, you will never be a Chinese: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2_L71lFItk


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